Why
BlackRock?
BlackRock is a global investment manager. Our founding mission was to start a company that thought differently about managing risk to better protect our clients, and it is still at our core today. No matter what your goals may be, at BlackRock, we are invested in your financial well-being.

Why BlackRock?

Take charge of
your finances
Money is ranked the #1 source of stress in people’s lives, higher than physical health, work or family. The key to tackling it? Making wealth a part of our overall picture of well-being. Taking small steps around our wealth can have benefits not just for the future, but also for our well-being today.
We surveyed 27,000 people around the globe to uncover the connection between wealth and well-being.
Retirees James and Inja Yates have donated over $70k to their community by hosting travelers. By investing for their future, they’re giving back today.
We’ve partnered with Girlboss on a series of educational emails to help you improve your financial standing once and for all.

Take charge of your finances

Tectonic shifts support tech
Disruptive innovations have long supported tech companies’ performance. Yet meaningful shifts in technology are creating differing impacts within and beyond the tech sector. We share our thoughts on how to approach tech investing.
Key measures of tech sector vs. global stocks, 2014-2019
Key measures of tech sector vs. global stocks, 2014-2019
SOURCES

Past performance is not a reliable indicator of current or future results. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. Sources: BlackRock Investment Institute, with data from Thomson Reuters, IBES, and Bloomberg, March 2019. Notes: We use the MSCI ACWI Index to represent global stocks broadly, and the MSCI ACWI Information Technology Index to represent global tech stocks. The numbers are five-year averages. Profit margin refers to operating income, calculated by dividing operating income by net sales, on a trailing 12-month basis. Valuation refers to the 12-month forward price-to-earnings ratio. Debt coverage refers to the EBITDA-debt ratio.

Tectonic shifts support tech

Lower your
investment fees
Investors who are looking to lower fees in their portfolio, or get started at a low cost, may want to consider broad index exchange traded funds (ETFs).
While stocks, bonds and commodities have been around for centuries, index funds have revolutionized how investors access these assets.
AGG
A low-cost, easy way to diversify a portfolio using fixed income.

Lower your investment fees

U.S. recession? Not quite
We see a slowdown in global growth and corporate earnings in 2019 as the U.S. economy approaches a late-cycle phase. We don’t see a recession as near, but growing economic and market uncertainty means investors may want to position portfolios accordingly.
Building a resilient portfolio is about more than dialing down risk. Taking risk in select areas can help investors achieve long-term goals.
We see bonds as a viable source of income and as a way to reduce portfolio risk.
USMV
Made from a mix of U.S. stocks that demonstrate lower risk, to help reduce volatility from market swings.

U.S. recession? Not quite

Invest sustainably without sacrifice
For years, many people saw investing sustainably as a tradeoff of value for “values.” The reality? That’s no longer the case. From Millennials asking more of the companies they invest in to governments expanding regulation to incorporate sustainability, we believe sustainable investing is something individuals can no longer afford to ignore.
What’s caused sustainable investing’s move to mainstream? We discuss what’s behind a strategy that only looks set to keep growing.
Brian Deese, Global Head of Sustainable Investing, discusses how data and technology have allowed better insight into how companies are performing against environmental, social and governance goals.
SDG
Invests in companies that seek to address some of the world’s major social and environmental challenges while maintaining exposure to global stocks.

Invest sustainably without sacrifice

Should markets take note of cyberattacks?
TOP LINE
Cyberattacks by state and non-state actors have increased in sophistication and quantity. We see a persistent risk of attacks on business-critical infrastructure and major elections — and would worry particularly about a nation state attacking the U.S.
Reason for concern
Increased internet-connected devices and availability of open source code have lowered the barriers to entry for cyber actors, leading to increased attacks. Cyberattacks are increasingly becoming part of the arsenal of nation states. For example, North Korea’s cyber capabilities are growing in scale and sophistication.
Reason for concern
Many companies have witnessed sharp share price declines after disclosing cyberattacks in recent years. Attacks have typically targeted companies with large amounts of personal data.
Impact of cyberattacks on companies
Chatter down, risk up
Market talk of cyberattacks has edged down, making the potential market impact bigger.
BlackRock Geopolitical Risk Indicator
SOURCES

Sources: BlackRock Investment Institute, with data from Thomson Reuters. Data as of December 14, 2018. Notes: We identify specific words related to this geopolitical risk and use text analysis to calculate the frequency of their appearance in the Thomson Reuters Broker Report and Dow Jones Global Newswire databases as well as on Twitter. We then adjust for whether the language reflects positive or negative sentiment, and assign a score. A zero score represents the average BGRI level over its history from 2003 up to that point in time. A score of one means the BGRI level is one standard deviation above the average. We weigh recent readings more heavily in calculating the average. The BGRI’s risk scenario is for illustrative purposes only and does not reflect all possible outcomes as geopolitical risks are ever-evolving.

BOTTOM LINE
We find limited market attention to the rising risk of major cyberattack, indicating its occurrence could have a high impact on global equities. Potential market implications of cyberattacks could include a selloff in global risk assets as investors flee to perceived safe haven assets. At-risk industries include utilities, energy and defense companies.
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Should markets take note of cyberattacks?

This story originally appeared in
BlackRock Geopolitical Risk Dashboard on December 7, 2018

Should markets take note of cyberattacks?

USMV

57.94

Net Asset Value ($)

11.03

Total Returns (%)

AGG

108.51

Net Asset Value ($)

2.61

Total Returns (%)

SDG

58.08

Net Asset Value ($)

9.49

Total Returns (%)