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BLACKROCK FUTURE FORUM

Sustainability: The path to net zero

Innovative leaders in finance, sustainable energy and the auto industry discuss the crucial role businesses will play in transforming the economy to net-zero carbon emissions in the years ahead. Sustainable investing professionals discuss the risks and opportunities presented by the coming transition.

Coming together to build a sustainable future

Governments, companies and individuals around the world feel the climate urgency. They are bearing down on the need to reduce carbon emissions in order to head off worst-case climate change scenarios. We collectively need to pursue and promote innovations throughout the economy to reduce the cost of going green and boost consumer demand for sustainable products and services. Finance is vital to develop sustainable solutions and technologies. Increasingly, investors will allocate capital in ways that favor companies with climate-aware practices. To explore the future of sustainability in business and investing, we convened four of the most influential leaders in the corporate and finance worlds and five leading investors with deep experience in sustainable strategies.

The tectonic shift to sustainable investing
Three powerful forces are converging to drive a long-term trend in favor of sustainable assets. Investors positioned for the shift stand to benefit.
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Innovating for a sustainable future: keynote sessions

The BlackRock Future Forum begins with CNBC newscaster Becky Quick moderating a conversation between Bill Gates, founder of Breakthrough Energy, and BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink. They discuss the urgency of more-sustainable practices across the economy, the path to a future with net-zero carbon emissions and the connections between climate risk and investment risk. Next, BlackRock Chief Client Officer Mark McCombe leads two discussions with groundbreaking auto-industry leaders: Mary Barra, Chairman and CEO of General Motors, and R.J. Scaringe, Founder and CEO of electric vehicle company Rivian. Barra and Scaringe discuss the massive transition facing their industry over the next two decades, as the push for sustainability disrupts everything from vehicle production to fueling.

Quotation start

The same thing that allowed the dream of a personal computer to become real—we've got to apply that to climate problems.

Quotation end
Bill Gates Founder of Breakthrough Energy

Zach Buchwald: Welcome to the BlackRock Future Forum Sustainability edition. I'm Zach Buchwald, and it's my pleasure to welcome you here today. BlackRock created the Future Forum as a means for exploring the big topics that underpin investment decision making and that impacts all of our financial futures. Some of our past sessions have explored retirement and savings, quality health care -- topics that affect us not only as investors but that also impact our daily lives. This session of the Future Forum is different.

We're calling it the “Path to Net Zero,” reflecting the commitment to reduce incremental greenhouse gases by 2050. Relative to retirement or health care, climate has historically been a little less connected to our daily lives; but now, in fact, there is almost no topic that is more central to our collective future. Just think about the headlines over the past year: the California coastline completely immersed in smoke, Texas blanketed with snow, crops across the Midwest dying from the heat or being washed away by floods.

If it feels like the whole world is waking up to the climate crisis at the same moment, it's because we are. “How to fight climate change” was at the top of Google's most-searched questions in 2020. And in fact, 2020 was the hottest year ever on the planet. For investors, climate change brings a series of complicated risks. BlackRock now makes environmental considerations part of all our investment decisions because we believe they directly contribute to investment outcomes.

And we've also asked the companies in which we invest to incorporate sustainability into their business models. For some time, we've talked about climate change as a risk. And of course, it is. But now we can also turn that formulation on its head because climate is a big, big opportunity. And that's why I'm so excited about this chapter of the Future Forum. We're going to explore some of the ways in which we, as investors, can take advantage of that opportunity by driving and participating in climate innovation.

And today we are joined by true visionaries leading the sustainable revolution, in large part through innovation. We're going to open with a discussion from two of the most visible advocates for a sustainable future: Microsoft founder Bill Gates and BlackRock CEO Larry Fink. Following Larry and Bill, we're going to explore the evolution happening in the auto industry as exemplified by two very different companies with their own unique missions, featuring Mary Barra from General Motors and RJ Scaringe from Rivian, the electric-vehicle startup.

As always, we conclude the Future Forum with a segment featuring actionable investment ideas. And this time you'll hear from BlackRock investors Teresa O'Flynn, Eric Rice, Mary-Catherine Lader and Paul Bodnar, along with Kirsty Jenkinson from California State Teachers' Retirement System. Before we get started, I encourage you to familiarize yourself with the tech interface we're using. There's a place to ask questions, a place to chat with your fellow attendees, and periodically you'll see a place to participate in real-time polls that provide insight into what your peers are thinking.

I'll join you live in the chat room to discuss the content and to analyze the polling results. And following the conference, you'll be able to access replays of all of the sessions on this platform as well as on the BlackRock website. Now, without further ado, I am delighted to kick off our first conversation, with Larry Fink and Bill Gates. And I pass the mic to the host of that discussion, Becky Quick.

MKTGH0421U/M-1613536

Zach Buchwald: Welcome to the BlackRock Future Forum Sustainability edition. I'm Zach Buchwald, and it's my pleasure to welcome you here today. BlackRock created the Future Forum as a means for exploring the big topics that underpin investment decision making and that impacts all of our financial futures. Some of our past sessions have explored retirement and savings, quality health care -- topics that affect us not only as investors but that also impact our daily lives. This session of the Future Forum is different.

We're calling it the “Path to Net Zero,” reflecting the commitment to reduce incremental greenhouse gases by 2050. Relative to retirement or health care, climate has historically been a little less connected to our daily lives; but now, in fact, there is almost no topic that is more central to our collective future. Just think about the headlines over the past year: the California coastline completely immersed in smoke, Texas blanketed with snow, crops across the Midwest dying from the heat or being washed away by floods.

If it feels like the whole world is waking up to the climate crisis at the same moment, it's because we are. “How to fight climate change” was at the top of Google's most-searched questions in 2020. And in fact, 2020 was the hottest year ever on the planet. For investors, climate change brings a series of complicated risks. BlackRock now makes environmental considerations part of all our investment decisions because we believe they directly contribute to investment outcomes.

And we've also asked the companies in which we invest to incorporate sustainability into their business models. For some time, we've talked about climate change as a risk. And of course, it is. But now we can also turn that formulation on its head because climate is a big, big opportunity. And that's why I'm so excited about this chapter of the Future Forum. We're going to explore some of the ways in which we, as investors, can take advantage of that opportunity by driving and participating in climate innovation.

And today we are joined by true visionaries leading the sustainable revolution, in large part through innovation. We're going to open with a discussion from two of the most visible advocates for a sustainable future: Microsoft founder Bill Gates and BlackRock CEO Larry Fink. Following Larry and Bill, we're going to explore the evolution happening in the auto industry as exemplified by two very different companies with their own unique missions, featuring Mary Barra from General Motors and RJ Scaringe from Rivian, the electric-vehicle startup.

As always, we conclude the Future Forum with a segment featuring actionable investment ideas. And this time you'll hear from BlackRock investors Teresa O'Flynn, Eric Rice, Mary-Catherine Lader and Paul Bodnar, along with Kirsty Jenkinson from California State Teachers' Retirement System. Before we get started, I encourage you to familiarize yourself with the tech interface we're using. There's a place to ask questions, a place to chat with your fellow attendees, and periodically you'll see a place to participate in real-time polls that provide insight into what your peers are thinking.

I'll join you live in the chat room to discuss the content and to analyze the polling results. And following the conference, you'll be able to access replays of all of the sessions on this platform as well as on the BlackRock website. Now, without further ado, I am delighted to kick off our first conversation, with Larry Fink and Bill Gates. And I pass the mic to the host of that discussion, Becky Quick.

MKTGH0421U/M-1613536

Highlights include:
01

How to decrease the green premium

Bill Gates contends that the economy’s great challenge is to reduce the "green premium"—the additional cost of carbon-neutral products over carbon-intensive ones. That job, he says, demands both innovation and consumer demand that will drive investment and economies of scale.

02

How Rivian is creating the mass market for EVs

Roughly 2% of new vehicles sold in 2020 were electric (EVs). As we look to increase that number to 100%, startups, like Rivian, and established companies all play a key role in innovating and pioneering new technologies and business models to drive mass adoption of EVs and spur competition.

03

An iconic car brand commits to electrification and net zero

GM has committed to electrifying all of its passenger cars by 2035. To achieve this goal, the company is reinventing itself, and started with empowering their people to be part of the EV transition. Cultivating talent and continuous innovation is paving the way to overcome hurdles to increased consumer demand and adoption.

Becky Quick: I want to ask you, do you consider the developing countries to be a bigger problem in terms of what you can get them to commit to and be onboard? Or do you think the developed nations are the ones where there's a bigger problem because democracy is messy?

Bill Gates: Well, the bulk of emissions in the decades ahead will come from developing countries. Let's think of it in three tiers. The rich countries, that's Europe, U.S., Japan.

The middle income countries, that's where most of humanity lives. That's China on the high end, high/middle income, and India on the low end. And you've got Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and Vietnam, a lot of the world's population there. And then you have some very poor countries, a lot in Africa. The responsibility to innovate rests entirely on the rich countries and, particularly, on the U.S.

Because the U.S. has the universities, the national labs. It's got the ability to organize risk-oriented capital. So we will not solve climate change without the rich world driving down dramatically -- perhaps we need over 90 percent reduction in those green premiums. That's what will make it economic for the middle income countries, who are not responsible for the historic emissions, and who are dealing with more basic needs.

They're not going to cut back and say, “Okay. We're not going to do air conditioning in India.” Because, after all, climate change means they really are going to need it. In fact, they haven't been advocates as much and, yet, a lot of those countries are nearer the Equator and are going to suffer dramatically more than more temperate zone customers. So I do expect them to become even stronger advocates in those areas.

But if the rich countries don't lead the way, then it absolutely is not going to happen. So it takes both the rich countries and the middle income countries.

Becky Quick: Part of the problem in the United States is local regulatory infrastructure, too. Slowing down things that would need to happen to, let's say, build transmission lines across the United States. How do we tackle that?

Bill Gates: Yeah. That particular problem I'm pretty exercised about. Because to build this new electric grid that the Biden Administration has said, “Hey, let's have a green grid by 2035,” well, that grid is going to have to be two-and-a-half to three times bigger than today's. Because as you shift heating all the buildings from natural gas to electricity, as you shift the energy that makes your car drive up a hill from gasoline to electricity, it just drives up aggregate electricity demand.

So you're having to grow the electric network at the same time that you're making it green, and you have to keep it cheap and you have to keep it reliable. And that is very, very daunting. And the greatest bottleneck to do that is the inability to build transmission. The sources of renewable power, which will be over 80 percent of how we do generation, they're not in the same place where you use the power.

In the past, you could put the coal plant, the natural gas plant, and the nuclear plant near to where the power usage was. But the wind in the U.S. onshore is mostly in the center of the country. The power usage is more on the coast. So now we have an open source model that people can fill in and show what you think this 2035 grid looks like.

Where are the sources? And then we can run a simulation and say, “Did you maintain reliability in the top weather conditions?” And so now the discussion is going to be concrete. But it's going to be very hard to get that grid going, even if we clear all of the transmission bottlenecks.

Becky Quick: Is that a conversation that's taking place at the federal level right now in the right places in the Administration?

Bill Gates: Well, since they said they have this goal of 2035, it's unlike something that's like 30 years away, where most people think, “Hey, I won't be in charge, and maybe it will get easier 15 years from now and my successor -- either political successor or CEO successor -- they'll have to worry about it.” When we have this as a 15 year goal to have this green grid, now you're engaging the engineers in the seriousness of the various utility companies.

And you're saying to them, “Hey, you look at this model. What do you think will happen?” And so the realization that that goal is extremely hard to achieve over the next few years, we really will get responsible engineering type thinking that will show, oh, my goodness, even to hit 2040 we would have to build transmission, storage, wind, solar, and some non-weather dependent energy source, which could be nuclear, but that's got its own challenges.

Now this is getting real. And finally it's part of the maturation of this whole field. As Larry said, people could throw around the idea of, “Okay, we're a net zero company.” Well, now we're putting in place definitions. The leading companies are starting to pay for offsets, which is amazing. It's fantastic.

But some of those offsets haven't really been looked at in terms of the real impact they have. And so that's another effort, is to have certification of different offsets. Some of which are very, very strong, like carbon capture and sequestration, where it stays underground for millions of years. And some, like if you just plant a tree one time, that only keeps the carbon out for, at most, decades.

Becky Quick: I think one of the things that has surprised me most during this last year with the pandemic that took all of our attention and changed all of our lives so drastically is that climate change didn't go away. That [talk] didn't go away like it did in 2008. And, Larry, you mentioned that in your letter, too. It became something that was even more front and center. Why do you think that is?

Larry Fink: I think when we have to respond to an existential health risk that we all had to face, we all read about pandemics, we all talked about them. We were all frightened of it. Movies, popular culture has always been about the potential of a pandemic and high death rates. And here we are, we have a reality. It's real. And so it's not pop culture, it's reality. And I think that's a big point because it went from pop culture and history books to reality.

And at the same time, we're experiencing more physical climate risk impacts in many parts of the world. And I think that existential health risk is now elevating the consciousness of many people of the existential health risk to the planet. And I think they connect very closely. And I could speak about many of our young people that work at the firm.

Their lives were much more impacted working remotely than people who have been in the business a long time. They had their connections within the business. They were more isolated. They're also thinking about their broad future and their future life. And they are speaking more loudly than most components of our population about climate risk and what does that mean for their future, too.

So I think it's all interconnected. I think it's all interconnected in terms of our consciousness. Okay, this is not pop culture. The COVID-19 is real. And this existential question about climate risk is now becoming more real. And as Bill suggested now, if we have a program that we want to get to a point in 15 years versus 30, that becomes more real, too.

So I think this is all part of society recognizing these risks and society having a fear of that future. And society is now asking questions about how do we resolve this? We're not completely there yet. But with our scale in terms of the amount of money we manage for so many people, we get all this input. And the input now, I can tell you, is so dominated by this whole concept of climate risk and transition risk.

MKTGH0421U/M-1613682

Extended interview: Larry Fink and Bill Gates

For a world dependent on carbon, where and how can we collectively spur action and accelerate the change we need? Two industry visionaries explore their personal journeys and opportunities for the clean energy transition, including the innovations and catalysts needed across the public and private sectors.

New opportunities in a new economy: investor perspectives

Four of BlackRock’s sustainable investing experts as well as the sustainable director of the second-largest public pension fund in the U.S. share their views on climate-aware investing in a conversation hosted by Zach Buchwald, BlackRock's Head of Institutional Business for the U.S. and Canada. Paul Bodnar, Mary-Catherine Lader, Teresa O'Flynn, Eric Rice and Kirsty Jenkinson discuss the companies and investors’ responsibility to help push the global economy toward net-zero carbon emissions. They say the transition to a more-sustainable economy offers myriad opportunities for investors in public equities, private capital, fixed income and other assets.

Quotation start

The reality is that the net zero transition and its investment opportunity won't just be about a few industries. It will be about the whole interconnected economy

Quotation end
Eric Rice Head of Impact Investing at BlackRock

Zach Buchwald: Okay. We're going to move on now from autos to our next and final segment: What does  all of this change mean for investment portfolios? We've asked five sustainable investing experts to discuss how climate considerations drive their portfolio outcomes. One thing that we've heard from our speakers so far today is how vast the opportunity is for investment in innovation.

So I'm excited to talk about innovation first with Teresa O'Flynn, Global Head of Sustainable  Investing for BlackRock Alternative Investors. Teresa's responsible for integrating sustainability across our hedge funds, real estate, infrastructure, private equity, and credit businesses. Welcome to the Future Forum, Teresa.

Teresa O'Flynn: Thank you, Zach. I'm delighted to be here.

Zach Buchwald: Good to see you. Teresa, we just heard from Rivian as an example of a company that accessed capital in the private markets as a way to accelerate its growth.

And Rivian, I think, is emblematic of a trend in that sustainability is central to the whole investment premise. So Teresa, my question for you is, looking across your whole investment remit, how are the private markets catalyzing the transition to a more sustainable economy?

Teresa O'Flynn: So Zach, that's a great question, and I believe that private capital has a unique role to play in the transition to a more sustainable economy. And the reason for that is threefold: Firstly, with greater proximity to portfolio holdings, direct ownership, often majority positions, coupled with the longer hold periods, these factors go hand in   hand with driving long-term sustainable outcomes.

Secondly, and you heard it from Bill and Larry today, we're going to need a lot of innovation to meet the challenges, both the risks and opportunities, that sustainability trends are creating across several sectors, be that energy transition, circular economy. And a lot of that innovation you will find in your private companies.

And finally, a defining characteristic of private markets investing is the injection of expertise in addition to the injection of capital to help companies grow, improve, and achieve long-term strong financial returns.

Zach Buchwald: Teresa, I want to talk a little bit more about innovation because getting to net zero is going to require a lot of innovation across sectors like power, transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, and also new technologies that are focused directly on negative emissions and carbon capture.

Maybe tell us about some of the decarbonization opportunities that you're working on and that you're excited about.

Teresa O'Flynn: So when we look at the decarbonization landscape, we think about the investment opportunity set in three major buckets: Firstly, reducing energy use, more efficient equipment, more efficient buildings, more efficient industrial processes. Secondly, using clean energy everywhere, and that includes wind and solar right the way through to new sources such as hydrogen.

And then finally, actively taking carbon out of the system. The most mature part of that opportunity set is wind and solar, and it's an area that we've been investing in for the last 10 years. And what you've seen happen in the sector is incredible cost declines over the last 10-15 years. To give you an example, the International Energy Agency predicted that it would take 36 years for solar to achieve the cost declines that the industry actually achieved in six years.

So this rapid cost decline that we've seen in this sector, and we've also seen it in the wind sector, has positioned wind and solar to be cost competitive with other sources of energy in about 70 percent of the world today. To achieve the goal of net zero by 2050, we need to see this rapid cost decline play out in multiple sectors across a range or low carbon solutions, especially for the hard to decarbonize sectors such as concrete, steel, aviation, and shipping.

And we believe that private capital has a major role to play in this transformation.

Zach Buchwald: Really good stuff. Last topic, Teresa: Today we focused on the E in ESG. But impact investing does in fact intersect with other challenges like financial inclusion, education, health and wellbeing. Tell us how you think about these related themes, and perhaps give us an example of how you address them in your investing.

Teresa O'Flynn: So I would say given the hands-on nature of private market capital, it has a unique ability to play in unlocking and scaling impact.

If we take education as an example, and with an impact lens, the focus needs to be on building better access to education for all citizens. With the global pandemic, we've seen an increase in opportunities around online learning, but also reskilling of workers looking to change career path. And that's an interesting example of the intersection between E and S.

As we think about the energy transition that we're on, this massive path of decarbonization, a lot of workers in the fossil fuel industry will need to reskill, will need to find new employment if we're to achieve a just transition. So in our view, if you can redirect the flow of capital in the private markets to solve some of these pressing sustainability problems, it really is an extension of our mission and purpose here at BlackRock to help more and more people enjoy a more sustainable future and more financial wellbeing.

Zach Buchwald: Yeah, the reskilling of workers is interesting stuff, and it's right at the heart of our partnership at BlackRock with Generation. We'll post more about Generation on the BlackRock Future Forum website. All right, thank you, Teresa. Appreciate your joining us here today.

Teresa O'Flynn: You're welcome, Zach. It was great to be here.

Zach Buchwald: Okay. We're going to move on now from autos to our next and final segment: What does  all of this change mean for investment portfolios? We've asked five sustainable investing experts to discuss how climate considerations drive their portfolio outcomes. One thing that we've heard from our speakers so far today is how vast the opportunity is for investment in innovation.

So I'm excited to talk about innovation first with Teresa O'Flynn, Global Head of Sustainable  Investing for BlackRock Alternative Investors. Teresa's responsible for integrating sustainability across our hedge funds, real estate, infrastructure, private equity, and credit businesses. Welcome to the Future Forum, Teresa.

Teresa O'Flynn: Thank you, Zach. I'm delighted to be here.

Zach Buchwald: Good to see you. Teresa, we just heard from Rivian as an example of a company that accessed capital in the private markets as a way to accelerate its growth.

And Rivian, I think, is emblematic of a trend in that sustainability is central to the whole investment premise. So Teresa, my question for you is, looking across your whole investment remit, how are the private markets catalyzing the transition to a more sustainable economy?

Teresa O'Flynn: So Zach, that's a great question, and I believe that private capital has a unique role to play in the transition to a more sustainable economy. And the reason for that is threefold: Firstly, with greater proximity to portfolio holdings, direct ownership, often majority positions, coupled with the longer hold periods, these factors go hand in   hand with driving long-term sustainable outcomes.

Secondly, and you heard it from Bill and Larry today, we're going to need a lot of innovation to meet the challenges, both the risks and opportunities, that sustainability trends are creating across several sectors, be that energy transition, circular economy. And a lot of that innovation you will find in your private companies.

And finally, a defining characteristic of private markets investing is the injection of expertise in addition to the injection of capital to help companies grow, improve, and achieve long-term strong financial returns.

Zach Buchwald: Teresa, I want to talk a little bit more about innovation because getting to net zero is going to require a lot of innovation across sectors like power, transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, and also new technologies that are focused directly on negative emissions and carbon capture.

Maybe tell us about some of the decarbonization opportunities that you're working on and that you're excited about.

Teresa O'Flynn: So when we look at the decarbonization landscape, we think about the investment opportunity set in three major buckets: Firstly, reducing energy use, more efficient equipment, more efficient buildings, more efficient industrial processes. Secondly, using clean energy everywhere, and that includes wind and solar right the way through to new sources such as hydrogen.

And then finally, actively taking carbon out of the system. The most mature part of that opportunity set is wind and solar, and it's an area that we've been investing in for the last 10 years. And what you've seen happen in the sector is incredible cost declines over the last 10-15 years. To give you an example, the International Energy Agency predicted that it would take 36 years for solar to achieve the cost declines that the industry actually achieved in six years.

So this rapid cost decline that we've seen in this sector, and we've also seen it in the wind sector, has positioned wind and solar to be cost competitive with other sources of energy in about 70 percent of the world today. To achieve the goal of net zero by 2050, we need to see this rapid cost decline play out in multiple sectors across a range or low carbon solutions, especially for the hard to decarbonize sectors such as concrete, steel, aviation, and shipping.

And we believe that private capital has a major role to play in this transformation.

Zach Buchwald: Really good stuff. Last topic, Teresa: Today we focused on the E in ESG. But impact investing does in fact intersect with other challenges like financial inclusion, education, health and wellbeing. Tell us how you think about these related themes, and perhaps give us an example of how you address them in your investing.

Teresa O'Flynn: So I would say given the hands-on nature of private market capital, it has a unique ability to play in unlocking and scaling impact.

If we take education as an example, and with an impact lens, the focus needs to be on building better access to education for all citizens. With the global pandemic, we've seen an increase in opportunities around online learning, but also reskilling of workers looking to change career path. And that's an interesting example of the intersection between E and S.

As we think about the energy transition that we're on, this massive path of decarbonization, a lot of workers in the fossil fuel industry will need to reskill, will need to find new employment if we're to achieve a just transition. So in our view, if you can redirect the flow of capital in the private markets to solve some of these pressing sustainability problems, it really is an extension of our mission and purpose here at BlackRock to help more and more people enjoy a more sustainable future and more financial wellbeing.

Zach Buchwald: Yeah, the reskilling of workers is interesting stuff, and it's right at the heart of our partnership at BlackRock with Generation. We'll post more about Generation on the BlackRock Future Forum website. All right, thank you, Teresa. Appreciate your joining us here today.

Teresa O'Flynn: You're welcome, Zach. It was great to be here.

Highlights include:
01

Net-zero creates opportunities across the economy

In the transition to a net-zero economy, companies throughout the market will shift to lower carbon emissions and apply a variety of technologies and innovations to get us there. Public and private companies that demonstrate high transition readiness will offer compelling investment opportunities.

02

New tools and data for climate-aware investing

Lack of data historically has been a barrier to incorporate climate risk into portfolios. Now powerful new tools integrate climate science and policy analysis to measure climate change’s potential impact on investments—as well as investments’ potential impact on the climate.

03

Sustainable investing has produced alpha

Sustainable investments outperformed their counterparts in 2020 and have held up better during periods of market turmoil.1 As the economy transitions to net zero, markets should adjust in favor of the best-prepared companies. Climate-aware portfolios stand to be more resilient, helping those who embrace sustainability achieve their objectives.

Mary Barra
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, General Motors
Read biography
Paul Bodnar
Global Head of Sustainable Investing, BlackRock
Read biography
Zach Buchwald
Head of US & Canada Institutional Business, BlackRock
Read biography
Larry Fink
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, BlackRock
Read biography
Bill Gates
Founder of Breakthrough Energy
Read biography
Kirsty Jenkinson
Investment Director of Sustainable Investment and Stewardship Strategies, California State
Read biography
Mary-Catherine Lader
Head of Aladdin Sustainability, BlackRock
Read biography
Mark McCombe
Chief Client Officer, BlackRock
Read biography
Teresa O'Flynn
Global Head of Sustainable Investing for BlackRock Alternatives Investors, BlackRock
Read biography
Becky Quick
Co-Anchor of Squawk Box, CNBC
Read biography
Eric Rice
Head of Impact Investing, BlackRock
Read biography
RJ Scaringe
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Rivian
Read biography
BlackRock Future Forum
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