BlackRock World Mining Trust plc

How does mining touch our everyday life?

Click the elements for more information

Mobile Phones

The average smartphone user touches their phone on average 2,617 times a day, but have you ever thought about what goes into making your phone? Every device contains a range of metals that are all mined from the earth, which form the main sources of revenue for the companies the Trust invests in.

  • Ag
  • Al
  • Co
  • Li
  • Au
  • Cu

Silver

For mobile phones, it is used in the circuit board, with the typical iPhone containing approximately 0.34g of silver.

Gold is currently around
80 times more expensive
than silver and hence,
silver is more widely used for
industrial purposes.

Silver is mainly used in jewellery and silverware, with sterling silver containing typically 92.5% and the rest being copper or
another metal.

A soft and shiny precious metal and is the 47th element in the periodic table.

Aluminium

A silver-coloured, light and durable base metal and is the 13th element in the
periodic table.

For mobile phones, it is
used in the cases and
the componentry.

Other uses include automobiles, trains, aeroplanes, computers and cans.

It is the most widespread metal on earth and China is the largest producer.

Cobalt

A silvery-blue metal and is the 27th element in the
periodic table.

For mobile phones, it is used in the cathodes for re-chargeable batteries.

It is also used in the batteries for other appliances and can be magnetised, so is also used to make magnets.

By far the largest producer of cobalt is the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Lithium

For mobile phones, it is used in the re-chargeable batteries.

Lithium is also used in the batteries for laptops, digital cameras and electric vehicles.

A soft, silvery alkali metal and is the 3rd element in the periodic table.

The largest producers of lithium are Australia, Chile, Argentina and China.

Gold

For mobile phones, small amounts of gold are used in the circuit board as it’s chemically stable and conducts electricity.

The typical iPhone contains approximately 0.034g of gold.

A malleable precious metal, resistant to corrosion, and is the 79th element in the
periodic table.

Gold’s main use is in jewellery but is also considered to be an alternative currency and a ‘safe-haven’ investment asset.

Gold has been considered valuable for thousands of years, with the first gold coins believed to have been struck on the order of King Croesus of Lydia (an area that is now part of Turkey) around 550 BC.

Copper

A pinkish-orange-coloured, ductile base metal and is the 29th element in the
periodic table.

The largest producers of copper are Chile,
China and Peru.

Copper is a very good conductor of electricity making it well-suited
for wiring.

For mobile phones, it is used in the circuitry.

Click the elements for more information

Electrical vehicles

We are becoming increasingly less reliant on traditional internal combustion engines as cities across the UK are cleaning up their public transport vehicles with battery powered electric models. By summer 2019, London aims to have the largest fleet of double-decker electric buses in Europe, including batteries packed with different metals.

  • Co
  • Ni
  • Li
  • Cu

Cobalt

Around 95% of cobalt production is currently a by-product of copper and
nickel production.

For electric vehicles, it is used in the cathodes for re-chargeable batteries.

Cobalt gets its name from ‘kobald’, the German word for goblin, which was a superstitious term used for the ore by miners.

A silvery-blue metal and is the 27th element in the
periodic table.

Nickel

In the electric vehicle industry today, there is a general desire to move towards higher nickel content cathodes as this can lead to improvements in the energy density of
the batteries.

Ferro-nickel is mainly used for producing alloys such as stainless steel.

For electric vehicles, nickel sulphate is used in the cathodes for
re-chargeable batteries.

A silvery, resistant base metal and is the 28th element in the periodic table.

Lithium

For electric vehicles, it is used in re-chargeable batteries.

Lithium is also used in the batteries for laptops, digital cameras and mobile phones.

Assuming electric vehicles account for 17% of total passenger car sales by 2025, global lithium demand is expected to increase by 128% from 2018 levels.

A soft, silvery alkali metal and is the 3rd element in the periodic table.

Copper

A pinkish-orange-coloured, ductile base metal and is the 29th element in the
periodic table.

The average electric vehicle has over 5 times the copper content of an internal combustion engine vehicle.

Copper is a very good conductor of electricity making it well-suited
for wiring.

For electric vehicles, it is mainly used in the wiring.

Click the elements for more information

Modern urban buildings

Metal alloys, particularly steel, are vital to the development of modern high-rise buildings. However, energy-saving technologies are integrating even more metals into the structure of our buildings. Solar panels, which are placed on buildings to absorb sunlight as a source of energy and generate electricity, incorporate over 7 different metals.

  • Cu
  • Ag
  • Si
  • Fe

Copper

A pinkish-orange-coloured, ductile base metal and is the 29th element in the
periodic table.

The primary uses of copper are building construction, electronics and
transportation equipment.

Copper is a very good conductor of electricity making it well-suited
for wiring.

For modern urban buildings, copper is mainly used in the electrical wiring.

Silver

A soft and shiny precious metal and is the 47th element in the periodic table.

For modern urban buildings, a paste containing silver is used with silicon to produce solar panel cells.

Silver has the highest thermal conductivity of all the metals.

An average solar panel uses approximately 20 grams
of silver.

Silicon

When ultrapure, silicon is solid with a blue-grey, metallic appearance and is the 14th element in the periodic table.

For modern urban buildings, silicon is the key element for solar panels with first generation cells made from crystalline silicon.

Silicon is not found in its pure form in nature but instead as a dioxide, known as silica.

Silicon is used extensively as a semiconductor in devices such as computers.

China, Russia and the US are the largest producers
of silicon.

Iron

For modern urban buildings, iron ore is used to make steel which is used to produce the buildings’ frames.

Over 95% of iron ore is used to make steel, which is an alloy of iron, carbon and
other elements.

Iron is a shiny, greyish bulk commodity and is the 26th element in the periodic table.

The Burj Khalifa in Dubai reportedly contains 39,000 tonnes of steel.

The largest producers of iron ore are Australia and Brazil.

Trust specific risks: Mining shares typically experience above average volatility when compared to other investments. Trends which occur within the general equity market may not be mirrored within mining securities. Investment strategies, such as borrowing, used by the Trust can result in even larger losses suffered when the value of the underlying investments fall.

BlackRock World Mining Trust

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Issued by BlackRock Investment Management (UK) Limited (authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority). Registered office: 12 Throgmorton Avenue, London, EC2N 2DL. Registered in England No. 2020394. ID:MKTGH0219E-748363-1/1