The Candidates

Partito Democratico (PD)
Partito Democratico (PD)*
Democratic Party

Matteo Renzi
Centre-left
alliance
Forza Italia
Forza Italia
(FI)**
Forward Italy

Silvio Berlusconi
Centre-right
alliance
Movimento 5 Stelle
Movimento 5 Stelle (M5S)
Five Star Movement

Luigi Di Maio
Populist
anti-establishment
Liberi e Uguali
Liberi e Uguali
(LeU)
Free and Equal

Pietro Grasso

Left

*Running with a coalition of left-wing parties, including Più Europa (More Europe) and Civica Popolare (Popular Civic)
**Running with a coalition of right-wing parties including Lega Nord (Northern League) and Fratelli d’Itali (Brothers of Italy)

The System

This will be the first time Italy’s new voting system is put into practice following electoral reforms approved in November of last year. The so-called Rosatellum bis, named after its initial proponent, is a mixed electoral system.

How does it work?

Italians have two votes: one for the Chamber of Deputies and one for the Senate.

In each case, votes are either cast for an individual candidate or for a party – voters can choose.

There is no requirement to vote the same way in both elections.

The seats in each house are then apportioned using three different models:

First-past-the-post

Just like MPs in the UK, individuals are directly elected to represent their local constituency.

Proportional representation

Seats are allocated according to party lists, based on the proportion of votes received by party or alliance. To be eligible, a party must get a minimum of 3% of the total vote, or 10% in the case of coalitions. Any vote for an individual will also be counted towards the overall proportion that their party or coalition secures.

Overseas constituencies

A limited number of seats are reserved for representatives elected by Italian citizens residing abroad.

Click on the seats below to find out how they are assigned

Chamber of Deputies

630
Methods Seats Percentage

Senate of the Republic

315
Methods Seats Percentage

The Government

At the time of writing (15 February 2018), no party looks set to secure a Parliamentary majority. In such case, coalition talks between the parties will ensue until a government is formed.

There is no official candidate for prime minister on the ballot paper. It is the responsibility of the president, Sergio Mattarella, and newly elected senators and representatives to appoint this position.